Watertown Weather

69° F
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Sunday
08/19
Mostly Cloudy
Mainly cloudy. A few peeks of sunshine possible. High 71F. Winds NE at 10 to 20 mph.
High 71° / Low 61°
Partly Cloudy
Monday
08/20
Partly Cloudy
Mostly cloudy skies early, then partly cloudy in the afternoon. High 74F. Winds NE at 10 to 15 mph.
High 74° / Low 59°

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Piave Fiume on Facebook

Our prayers go out to all affected by the bridge collapse in Genoa, Italy. ... See MoreSee Less

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1 week ago

Watertown Sons-of-Italy

Very sad to report the passing of a great man and a great bocce player. May he Rest In Peace.FAREWELL TO METHUEN'S BOCCE KING …
Mario Pagnoni, who spread his joy for and knowledge of the game of bocce both near and far, died yesterday at the High Pointe House in Haverhill surrounded by family and friends.
Pagnoni, 70, was a former Methuen grammar school and high school teacher for 32 years as well as a Methuen High varsity baseball coach, a youth basketball coach, and a baseball umpire and mentor. But it was bocce – a sport open to everyone, where balls are rolled toward a target (the pallino ball) – that was his true passion.
Considered a national expert, Pagnoni authored several books on bocce including “The Joy of Bocce,” which Newsweek called “the definitive guide to the sport.” The fifth edition of that book was recently released. He loved teaching the game – whether on the Nevins Library lawn with Methuen kids, in Revere at the annual Bocce on the Beach event or with older athletes via the Ken Waldie Senior Sports Circuit.
Pagnoni was part of a team that brought nationally sanctioned bocce courts to the Methuen Sons of Italy, where he was a member. As a result, the SOI hosted the U.S. Bocce Nationals in 2015 – the first time the event took place on the East Coast and in New England.
“(Mario) helped design and build the courts here and at houses, hotels and corporations. He traveled all over the country teaching bocce,” noted Methuen Sons of Italy President Marguerite Sciuto, who had Pagnoni as a 7th-grade math teacher, then re-connected with him when she joined the Sons of Italy. “It’s a loss to the city of Methuen, a loss to the bocce community and huge loss to the Sons of Italy.”
Featured in MethuenLife many times through the years for his sports affiliations and charity work, Pagnoni, according to ML Sports Blitz writer John Molori, was a "Renaissance Man, a multi-talented guy whose heart and mind were without peer. His enthusiasm was inspirational."
Pagnoni leaves his beloved wife Carmela, who has been his devoted caretaker through his stroke and dementia battles, and sons Jimmy and Joey.
MethuenLife will share funeral service information when it is released.
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1 month ago

Watertown Sons-of-Italy

Upper function hall seats up to 275 people. Various examples of how the hall may be decorated. ... See MoreSee Less

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We congratulate all our scholarship award winners. Great group of individuals, good luck in your future endeavors! ... See MoreSee Less

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About

The Watertown Sons of Italy Lodge Piave Fiume was founded in 1920 by Salvatore Cesareo, Antonio Abbondanzio and Michele Pane, along with a group of 20 other Italian immigrants living in Watertown, Massachusetts.

Originally meeting in a back room of a Nichols Avenue grocery store, then moving to various rental facilities including Natoli’s Hall on Main Street, in 1938 the newly formed Windsor Club Trust bought the first Watertown Sons of Italy facility on Langdon Avenue. A popular sporting club, the Windsor Club was home to the Sons of Italy until 1943.

Meeting again in various buildings, including Bond’s Hall on Main Street, in 1947 the Lodge
purchased land from the Hood Rubber Company on Bigelow Avenue in East Watertown
and using a Quonset Hut as a meeting hall. This meeting place lasted until 1955, when the
Lodge purchased a building from the Leavitt Shirt Company on Spring Street. Until the mid
1960s this large mill-type building served home to the Lodge, however due to wear and
tear it was time for a new home, so the building was sold. In the years to come meetings
where held in Eagles Hall and the Italian-American Social Club until the late 1960s where
meetings where held at the Whitney Plaza Apartment Complex, due to the generosity of
Pasquale ‘Pat’ Pannesi and efforts of Ralph Giradi. In 1970, under the leadership of Guy
Carbone and Paul Trombino, bond drives where held for the construction of a new building
on the land of 520 Pleasant Street. Finally in 1974 the current Pleasant Street building was
dedicated and became the permanent home of the Watertown Sons of Italy.

Bocce CourtsThe Bocce courts, located at the rear parking lot, were constructed by the vision of members Ferdinando Santamaria and Joseph Cimino. These two individuals are the catalysts who brought bocce to Watertown and made it what it is today. Over the years the Watertown Lodge has won many local and state tournaments, which are represented by the numerous awards on display in the Members Lounge.

Our name, Piave Fiume, was given to us by the founders who participated in a great battle, which took place at the River Piave, a river in northern Italy. In 1918, during World War I, it was the scene of Battle of the Piave River, the last major Austro-Hungarian attack on the Italian Front, which failed after costing Austria-Hungary nearly 200,000 casualties. The Battle of the Piave was the decisive battle of World War I on the Italian Front. The river is thus called in Italy ‘Fiume Sacro alla Patria’ (Sacred River of the Homeland). ‘La Leggenda del Piave’ (The Legand of the Piave) is an Italian patriotic song written by Ermete Giavanni Gaeta in June 1918. It is perhaps the most famous Italian song of the First World War dedicated to the resistance during the war.

River Piave

You may listen to the song here.

A painting, made by member Joseph Santoro, of this river and the bridge where the attack occurred hangs today in the upstairs main function hall.

The Watertown Sons of Italy Lodge #1036, is a filial lodge of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, under the jurisdiction of the Supreme Lodge of the Order Sons of Italy in America. Watertown Member Rodolfo Viscomi currently serves as the State Second Vice-President, along with Loreto Pellegrini as State Trustee. James DiStefano has served at a Past State President of Massachusetts, and currently is a National Delegate from District 3 at the Supreme Lodge.

A non-profit 501(c) 8 organization, the Lodge Piave Fiume has consistently raised tens of thousands of dollars annually to many deserving charities, scholastic scholarships and other non-profits, including:

Cooley’s Anemia Foundation

OSIA Commission for Social Justice

March of Dimes

Alzheimer’s Association

Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Austism

Toys for Tots

St. Mary of Carmen Society

Casa Monte Cassino

Watertown Youth Sports

Watertown School System

Nonantum Childrens Christmas Party Association

and many more

The Order Sons of Italy in America (OSIA) is the largest, oldest and most geographically
represented organization of Americans of Italian heritage in the United States. It is a non-
profit, non-sectarian, non-partisan fraternal organization.

The purpose of the entire organization is to enroll all eligible persons so that it may
successfully promote national education, charitable fundraising, secure adequate laws
for the benefit of its members, enrich and preserve the Italian culture and heritage and to
combat discrimination while protecting and upholding the positive image of the people of
Italian birth or descent.

The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is one of the many state organizations of the National
Order Sons of Italy in America with more than 600,000 members and supporters. The
National Lodge was organized in 1905, and the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts was
chartered in 1914 and encompasses Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont.

Vincenzo Sellaro

Originally called “L’Ordine Figli d’Italia,” the Order Sons of Italy in America was established in the Little Italy neighborhood of New York City on June 22, 1905, by Vincenzo Sellaro, M.D., and five other Italian immigrants who came to the United States during the great Italian migration (1880-1923). Their aim was to create a support system for all Italian immigrants that would assist them with becoming U.S. citizens, provide health/death benefits and educational opportunities and offer assistance with assimilation in America.

It was Dr. Sellaro who said, “Today I have a dream, that someday, even if it takes a hundred more years before we are fully accepted, our children and their children’s children, will be proud to carry on our traditions, culture and language. It is up to us, and what we do today.”  - June 22, 1905

OSIA Logo